SECOND SKIN. Fabrics of New Collection by Emilia Dell’ Oro

SECOND SKIN. Fabrics of New Collection by Emilia Dell’ Oro


There are clothes adored by woman. And there are clothes helping adore the woman once she wears them. This idea was crucial when creating the ultra-fashionable brand Emilia Dell’ Oro. Each dress in the new collection is created at the height of the latest global trends, on the edge of the most favorable and fashionable flows of any European woman.


Followers make leaders. So that’s dress makes a lady wearing it. Our Italian designers know for sure - even the most sophisticated, brilliantly cut and elegantly decorated dress can be defaced if fabric or materials chosen make no emphasis on its peculiarity; this way it is faded and inconspicuous.


Therefore, today we will talk about the latest trends in fabrics. You will find out what fabrics are used to create dresses, jackets, skirts, tops, pants and outerwear by Emilia Dell 'Oro. We will tell you how we select the luxurious materials and why exact colors and shades of fabrics are represented in the collections. And also, we will disclose the secret why Italian fabrics no less popular than Italian fashion.


ITALIAN FABRICS: HISTORY


We used to know the label “Made in Italy” means to be a seal of quality whatever it marks. But have you ever thought of the long historical way those things, including Italian textile, passed? In Florence, in the XIV century, huge workshops worked at wool coloring and woolen fabric production. They were delivered all over the Mediterranean. The fabrics were extraordinary requested because they possessed the high quality, durability, softness and were incredibly pleasant to touch.

Although, the most luxurious Italian fabrics at this time were produced by Venetians, not Florentines. Velvet was considered to be the richest textile. It was a symbol of power, and as it’s easy to guess, it was widely used to make clothing for priesthood, laity, and even for the Patriarch of Rome.


Italians had particular feelings for silk. Famous by this day, a fabric called lampasso, made with silver and golden fibers, was decorated with luxurious natural ornaments, such as flowers, plants and insects


Although the contemporary Italian fabrics, used for Emilia Dell 'Oro clothing, are created on modern textile equipment, the traditions of the XIVth century and the spirit of epochs are preserved in Italian designers’ approach. Just as 700 years ago, they sew as they build – for a full due: durable, beautiful and elegant.



EMILIA DELL’ ORO DESIGNERS’ CHOICE


  So what kinds of fabrics are crazy popular among Italian designers in the XXI century? What textiles are must-have at any fashionable Italian collection made for main world catwalks? Let’s find it out!

Velvet


Velvet is always up front and in the lead. It is the most noble fabric with a delicate texture and shiny, iridescent pile. For the first time it appeared in China, but thanks to its grace and texture, velvet quickly conquested the whole Europe, including Italian craftsmen.


New collections by Emilia Dell 'Oro have velvet of black, bottle green, burgundy and peach colors. Our designers believe that modest dress or two-piece suit made of velvet are the best outfits both for evening parties and business meetings with partners. By the way, velour and velveteen are two more types of velvet. Velveteen is a very durable, practical and excellent textile to wear. Therefore, it is often chosen to sew trousers. The same New collections by Emilia Dell 'Oro have velvet of black, bottle green, burgundy and peach colors. Our designers believe that modest dress or two-piece suit made of velvet are the best outfits both for evening parties and business meetings with partners. By the way, velour and velveteen are two more types of velvet. Velveteen is a very durable, practical and excellent textile to wear. Therefore, it is often chosen to sew trousers. The same characteristics are for velour. It shines a little more than velveteen and is called “the heavy velvet”, but it has the same features in durability and wearing.


Mark it up: if velvet has too vibrant and unnatural color, it means viscose, synthetics or cotton were added to the textile. The brighter and less natural color the more additives are in the textile.


Chiffon


Chiffon occupies a leading position among lightweight tissues. Thanks to its weightless, translucent and refined qualities, it became very popular with almost all women of the world. Chiffon is made by plain weave of crepe twist. If you ever touched its texture, then you understand such weaving brings chiffon the slight relief.


Emilia Dell 'Oro designers turn to chiffon in the warm season. In the spring and summer, our maîtres are inspired by virtues of this noble fabric when creating incredible skirts, tunics, dresses and culottes. Chiffon falls in elegant folds and flows beautifully through the body; it is comfortable to touch and breathable enough, hypoallergenic, lightweight and airy.


But obviously, this type of textile has some fanciful features.


Mark it up: it is not recommended to hand-launder the natural silk chiffon – it’s better to provide a dry-cleaning. Iron it from the wrong side with damp pressing gauze cloth. If chiffon is made of fibre silk, you can hand-launder it at 30°. Do not scrub the textile, and never twist and pull it. It is recommended to let it dry outlaid at fleecy towel.


Lace


Hundred years ago, as well as today the process of manufacturing of lace is considered to be very difficult and ritzy skill. Regarding the lace was only hand-made in France in the XVII-XVIII centuries, the technical progress and appearance of weaver looms brought lace manufacturing to larger scales. By means of changing materials and weaving method the lace became more resilient and long-lasting and also rather cheap.


Today lace is widely used in lingerie, leisure wear, wedding and evening dresses and even more. Any classic clothes – and don’t be surprised – can be turned to stunning luxurious image with the help of lace. It can decorate sleeves, lapels, collars, hems and other elements. It is important to keep the balance and don’t give the impression of vicious taste.


Emilia Dell’ Oro dresses represent two types of lace such as guipure and petinet. The first one is thicker and weaved on cellular cloth. Another one is airier for it has small eyelets.


Mark it up: clothes with lace are hand-laundered only, with sparing detergents at 40°.


Jacquard


Jacquard is a multicolored weaved textile created by the famous Frenchman Joseph Marie Jacquard. He invented a weaving machine for creating complex patterns, which he used to print the first versions of this luxurious textile. We adore jacquard not only for the opportunity to embody incredible floral patterns but also for its density and shape stability.


For Emilia Dell 'Oro, jacquard is a sign of almost tapestry dresses with lantern sleeves, puffball tulip skirts, luxurious maxi dresses with fantastic patterns all the way around.


Additional benefits of jacquard are the following: durability due to fabric, long-lasting due to density, light weight, wear resistance due to dense weaving.


Mark it up: be sure to remember jacquard may consist of completely different fibers, which means the care for two different wearables may differ. First of all, read the label to know the proper care. If there’s no such information, please follow our recommendations. Jacquard can be both hand-laundered and machine washed at low temperatures, approximately 30°. Use detergents for colors. We recommend not to twist the washed clothes and refuse machine wringing. Delicately hand wring and let it dry outlaid at fleecy towel. Ironing allowed from the wrong side. 


Satin

No less elegant than silk. No less festival than jacquard. No less elegant than lace. Multi-colored satin is a silk fabric, which is considered to be one of the oldest in the world. It is adored for its smoothness and fluidity of forms, possibility to maintain color and appearance for decades, color rendering and brightness, as well as hypoallergenicity.


Emilia Dell 'Oro collections represents satin in cocktail outfits. What else can be used to make a dress expected to be tender and light? Especially elegant are satin blouses with knobs and pearl buttons, and for sure satin skirts are the must-have of any women's wardrobe


Mark it up: nowadays, the composition of satin fabrics varies. Previously, it was made exclusively of silk fibers, but today there are impurities of cotton, viscose, polyester and nylon. So first of all, learn the label and find out what’s the detailed composition of fabric.


Usually, it is recommended to apply a wet cleaning for satin wearables. Hand clean the fabric at 30° in order not to stretch fibers. Do not twist and wring after washing. Let it dry outlaid at fleecy towel. Ironing is at medium heat setting with damp pressing gauze cloth.